ACPP news releases

Join us at our 2013 annual meeting!

ACPP members will select 2014's policy priorities at our annual meeting Saturday, Sept. 21, 2013, at St. John's A.M.E. Church in Montgomery. Four new proposals will compete with last year's priorities for five slots on ACPP's issue roster. Two other issues on the annual agenda are permanent priorities: tax reform and adequate state budgets for health care and human services. Review the issue proposals here.

Members will choose ACPP's priorities using a new voting system this year. Member groups in good standing can bring up to six representatives who can cast seven votes each, for a total of up to 42 votes per group. Individual members in good standing can cast up to five votes each. (A member can vote as an individual or a group representative, but not both.) Learn more about the new voting rules here.

Registration begins at 9:30 a.m. The ACPP meeting will last from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., with an Alabama Arise meeting to follow from 2:30 p.m. to 3 p.m. The meeting will be at St. John's A.M.E. Church, 807 Madison Ave., Montgomery, AL 36104. If you plan to attend, please RSVP by emailing lead organizer Pres Harris at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. .

Alabama's state K-12 funding cuts since 2008 are nation's second deepest

Alabama's cuts to state K-12 education funding since the start of the Great Recession have been the nation's second worst, according to a new study by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. The cuts have slowed Alabama's economic recovery and could hurt the state's future economic growth, ACPP executive director Kimble Forrister said.

"Education opens the doors of opportunity for hundreds of thousands of low-income Alabamians," Forrister said. "We can't strengthen our state's economy by eroding our foundation for economic growth."

Read ACPP's news release here.

Read the full report here.

Food assistance cuts coming for 900K+ Alabamians this fall

Nearly one in five Alabamians -- 910,000 people -- will face cuts to food assistance this fall when a temporary boost to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) expires, according to a new report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. The cuts will drain $98 million from Alabama's economy next year and deal a major blow to low-income Alabamians still trying to overcome the lingering effects of the Great Recession.

"SNAP benefits are a powerful tool to ease poverty," ACPP executive director Kimble Forrister said. "In tough times, we ought to look for more ways to help low-income families, instead of putting their food assistance on the chopping block."

Read the news release here.

Read the full report here.

Arise release: Immigration reform would boost Alabama tax revenues by $30 million

Alabama's state and local tax collections would increase by more than $30 million a year under the immigration reform bill that passed in the U.S. Senate, according to a new study by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy (ITEP). The bill also would decrease the federal deficit and boost undocumented immigrants' state and local tax contributions by more than $2 billion nationwide, ITEP finds.

"Undocumented immigrants already pay sales and property taxes in Alabama when they buy things or pay rent," ACPP executive director Kimble Forrister said. "Their share would go up even more under immigration reform. The Senate bill would mean more revenue and stronger growth for our state's economy."

Read the news release here.

Read the full report here.

38,000 Alabama military families benefit from working-family tax credits

About 38,000 Alabama families with current or former members of the armed forces benefit from the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or the low-income component of the Child Tax Credit, according to a new report by the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP). The credits improve economic security for these families and help boost their children's school performance and future job prospects.

"Our service members and veterans have answered the call of duty, and it's our duty to make sure they can provide for their families back home," ACPP executive director Kimble Forrister said. "Through worker credits like the EITC and the Child Tax Credit we can help young families make ends meet."

Read the news release here.

Read the full report here.