Special Publications

The State of Working Alabama 2014: Health coverage in Alabama: Where we've succeeded and where there's work left to do

Alabama has enjoyed great success in recent decades in ensuring that children and seniors have the health protection they need, according to a new Arise Citizens’ Policy Project report issued Tuesday as part of The State of Working Alabama 2014. But the state lags behind the nation when it comes to insuring young adults, nearly 30 percent of whom lack health coverage.

"Child care, construction and food service are essential jobs that are often low-paying, and the people who do that important work deserve the protection of health insurance," ACPP policy director Jim Carnes said. "The Marketplace makes affordable coverage available for tens of thousands of Alabamians. Closing the coverage gap would insure hundreds of thousands more. It's time for our state to take this important step toward a healthier, more secure Alabama for all."

Read ACPP's news release here.

Read the full report here.

The State of Working Alabama 2014: The growing divide: Alabama's income gap is approaching Gilded Age levels

When the income gap between the rich and everyone else gets too large, the resulting inequality can threaten America’s foundations of fairness, equality and opportunity. Income inequality is deep in Alabama, and it has been getting even deeper in recent decades. Between 1979 and 2007, the top 1 percent of Alabamians saw their incomes grow by nearly 159 percent. But for everyone else in the state, the average income growth in that time was just 20.5 percent.

Policy analyst Carol Gundlach's new report, part of ACPP's State of Working Alabama 2014 series, examines the growing income gap between the richest Alabamians and everyone else and considers the gap's implications for the state's economy and our children's future. The report also considers how Medicaid expansion, investments in education and infrastructure, and other public policies could mitigate the worst effects of income inequality and promote broadly shared prosperity for all Alabamians.

Read ACPP's news release here.

Read the full report here.

The State of Working Alabama 2014: On Labor Day, Alabama workers face high unemployment, lost jobs, stagnant wages and increased inequality

Many Alabama workers may find little reason to celebrate as we approach this Labor Day. The Great Recession is officially over, but the average Alabama worker has not yet recovered from it, as employment and jobs continue to lag behind and wages remain stagnant.

Policy analyst Carol Gundlach's new report, part of ACPP's State of Working Alabama 2014 series, examines the difficult employment, job and wage trends that working Alabamians face, as well as the growing income inequality between the top 1 percent and the rest of the population. The report also considers how Medicaid expansion, investments in infrastructure, an end to the state sales tax on groceries and other policies could help boost job growth, reduce unemployment and support Alabama workers.

Read ACPP's news release here.

Read the full report here.

The State of Working Alabama 2011

Well after the nation's official recovery from the Great Recession began, Alabama continued to feel the downturn's lingering effects in 2010: lower median household incomes, more poverty and more residents without health insurance. Unemployment has fallen from its 2009 peak, but the state's jobless rate remains above the national average. Higher poverty, fueled by lower incomes and stubbornly high unemployment, hit the state's youngest residents especially hard, with one in four Alabama children living below the poverty line in 2009-10.

Read news release here.

Read full report here.

The State of Working Alabama 2010

Like this summer's BP oil disaster, the Great Recession started for many Alabamians as something far away and impersonal. Then the disaster hit Alabama, and it hit hard. The resulting devastation was far-reaching, with scars that could last for decades even as things begin to return to normal.

Read news release here.

Read full report here.