Public Transportation

Alabama's public transportation system needs a tune-up, report concludes

Alabama's transportation system forces residents to rely too much on automobiles and undermines the state's economic growth, according to "Connecting Our Citizens for Prosperity," an October 2014 report released by Alabama State University's Center for Leadership and Public Policy. Jon Broadway, Ph.D., and ACPP policy analyst Stephen Stetson are the report's authors.

Alabama is one of only five states providing no state money for public transportation. That lack of investment effectively isolates many residents who are unable to drive or lack access to private vehicles, the study finds. It also means Alabama is forgoing the new jobs that building and maintaining public transit options would bring, ACPP executive director Kimble Forrister said.

"Our state's current transportation system simply can't be sustained," Forrister said. "Alabama's failure to invest in public transportation means too many of our neighbors can't get where they need to go when they need to get there. That doesn't just hurt them; it hurts our entire state's economy."

Read ACPP's news release here.

Read the full "Connecting Our Citizens for Prosperity" report here.

Public Transportation Policy Choices 2012

A 1952 amendment to Alabama's constitution (Amendment 93) makes it illegal to use state gasoline tax revenues for anything other than building and maintaining roads and bridges. As a result, the most logical source of state funding for public transportation remains off limits for such services in Alabama. Without any state transit funding, Alabamians will continue to lack the public transportation options that residents of many other states enjoy.

Read issue brief here.

Transportation Policy Choices 2007

A 1952 amendment to Alabama's constitution makes it illegal to use state gas tax and license fee revenues -- a logical source of transit funds -- for any purpose other than building and maintaining roads and bridge.

This fact sheet  This fact sheet outlines proposed public transportation funding legislation for 2007.

Alabama Roadblock: Our Public Transit Gap

Inadequate public transportation keeps thousands of Alabamians from meeting basic needs. More than 50 years after the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Alabama Department of Transportation (ALDOT) provides no public transit funding. A 1952 amendment to Alabama's constitution makes it illegal to use state gas tax and license fee revenuse -- a logical source of transit funds -- for any purpose other than building and maintaining roads and bridges.

 This fact sheet This fact sheet describes the history and current impact of Alabama's failure to fund public transportation.